Next month we’ll be celebrating our 50th year of independence! Eeek! How exciting.

Media 365 decided to develop a project to honour this momentous occasion. I won’t bore you with the backstory – you can read it on the website, but we basically decided to develop a documentary and music project to tell our story of independence.

64WD logo

When I say ‘our’ story, I mean one of the many versions that should matter to young people – the story of how to drive independence forward, how to get equitable wealth and development, how to determine our next 50 years. We’re doing this by talking to the people who lived through independence, the people who brought our nation to where it is today, and the ones who are here working for the next 50 years – the 64wders we’re dubbing them. I’ve had the pleasure of being present at some of the interviews and they have have been inspiring and led to other questions.

One such interview was with Kapumpe Musakanya, son of Valentine Musakanya, who did a lot for this country but was ultimately remembered by some as one of the key people in the 1980 coup attempt. Though the documentary doesn’t talk about any of that history, a pre and post interview chat with Kapumpe, and browsing through his dad’s book, The Musakanya Papers, led me to wonder more about this incidence in our history, and therefore others. Kapumpe did have a good point, we need to hear more of our STORIES of independence and not just ONE narrative.

I’m hardly an expert on our history, in fact I’d be hard pressed to remember anything I learnt in school about it, and the trip to national archives wasn’t that interesting – ok to be fair at the time we were only looking for photos – and so doing these interviews has been interesting. We have yet to interview the bulk of the freedom fighters and early politicians, but already it has been wondering…

Even when I was watching some of the Zamtel Road to Independence Day programming, I was worried about how much of it was fact checked, it seems all too easy to create and push the narrative you want.

The other day I was reading the Times of Zambia, where there was an article on the great friendship of KK and Simon Mwansa Kapwepwe, it was written in a way that implied Simon Mwansa Kapwepwe was our first Vice President. To my shock, a young person in the office at the time asked me who it was if not Mr Kapwepwe! Poor Mr Kamanga.

In an interview with Mr Elias Chipimo Snr (and Jnr), he talked about early days of governing Zambia, and listening to him, and my father, it dawn on me just how innovative they had to be. These guys were about 40 years old running a country for the first time, still working with people who didn’t even want them to be independent and making it difficult for them when they could.

We spoke to Mrs Petronella Chisanga, who was one of the youngest women, in the UNIP Central Committee who spoke about running an entire secondary school, one of only two at the time, at the age of 25! I couldn’t even imagine such responsibility at 25. But to speak to her, she is an amazingly intelligent and talented woman – plus she later went on to be MD of ZECO. She was truly one powerful woman and a force to recon with!

Through our interviews and conversations with our parents – it’s always easy to forget the wealth of information parents have! – is how I learnt that UNZA was crowd funded. People actually gave money and whatever else they had to build the university because they understood or desired the education that would take them forward. Amazing.

So launching our crowd-funding campaign to put this documentary together is nothing new for Zambia! I’m excited by this documentary and even more excited about the legs it has, should we raise enough money and then some to keep producing content that speaks to our stories, all the stories of Zambia.

Look out for the launch of our Indiegogo campaign on Facebook and twitter and keep updated on the project at the project blog.

Watch the pitch video/teaser

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